Moszna Castle

Moszna Castle

Moszna Castle is a medieval castle and palace in Moszna, a tiny Polish hamlet in southern Poland. The mansion, located between the villages of Prudnik and Krapkowice about 30 kilometers (19 miles) south of the regional capital Opole, is an exceptional example of romantic fairy-tale and eclectic architecture.

Although remnants of older vaults were discovered in the grounds during excavation and repair work at the beginning of the twentieth century, the building’s history dates back to the 18th century. Some of those may have been the ruins of a Templar castle. Following World War II, more digs revealed a medieval barrier.

Moszna Castle History

Moszna Castle
Moszna Castle

The castle’s major component is a historic baroque palace that was substantially damaged by fire on April 2, 1896, and was restored in its former form by Franz Hubert von Tiele-Winckler the following year (the son of Hubert von Tiele-Winckler). The reconstruction work included an addition to the house. By 1900, the building’s eastern Neogothic wing, as well as an adjacent orangery, had been completed. The western wing was constructed in the Neo-Renaissance style between 1912 and 1914. The castle’s architectural design incorporates a wide range of styles, making it eclectic in nature. The building’s height, as well as its multiple turrets and spires, give it a vertical appearance. The castle as a whole has Ninety-nine turrets to be exact. It has 365 rooms on the inside, with a total floor area of 7,000 sq. m. and a cubic capacity of around 65,000 m3. The German Emperor Wilhelm II paid two visits to the castle. In 1911 and the next year, his participation in hunting during his stay at the castle was noted in a handwritten chronicle.

From 1866 until the spring of 1945, when the Silesian Tiele-Winckler family was forced to evacuate to Germany, the castle in Moszna was home to the industrial magnates of the Silesian Tiele-Winckler family. While the fortress was temporarily captured, what remained of Germany west of the Oder-Neisse Line by the Soviet Red Army and this part of Silesia was placed under Polish jurisdiction by the victorious allies, with the remaining German population being expelled. The Soviet Union only existed for a brief time. In comparison to the minimal damage inflicted by the Second World War, control did substantial harm to the castle’s internal furnishings.

Neo-baroque architectural styles are used on the front facade.

After WWII, the castle had no permanent owner and was home to a number of organizations until 1972., when it became a convalescent facility. Later, it was renamed the Public Health Care Centre for Neurological Therapies. Tourists can now visit it because the health institution has relocated to another facility in the area. The castle also contains a performance hall in the form of a chapel. Since 1998, the castle has been home to a gallery where works by various artists are displayed on a regular basis. Aside from the castle, the complex also comprises a park with no defined boundaries that incorporates neighboring farms, meadows, and a woodland. Only the park’s main axis may be described as geometrical. It goes to the castle from the entrance, passing through oak and finally horse-chestnut avenues. The park continues on into an avenue of lime trees with symmetrical canals running along both sides of the path, bordered with a few different types of plants rhododendrons. The park’s axis comes to a halt at the base of a former Hubert von Tiele-Winckler monument. There is a pond on the eastern side of the avenue with an islet that the owners refer to as Easter Island. The islet is surrounded by needle-leaved plants and is accessible by a Chinese-style bridge. The garden, like the rest of the park complex, was renovated somewhat before the castle. Hubert von Tiele-Winckler is credited with improving the garden’s aesthetic qualities, according to documentation dating from 1868.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.